Blind mice see again

Blind mice see again

Posted on 19th April 2012

The journal Nature has published evidence of blind mice being made to see after receiving a transplant of retinal cells.

The mice received an implant of immature retinal rod cells taken from younger mice. After 4-6 weeks they were able to complete a test requiring vision that previously they could only complete by chance.

As always, human trials and possible applicaitons in the treatment of eye disease is still many years off but this is the first evidence that retinal cells can be successfully transplanted and connect properly to the visual system into the new host.

This research follows on from what we previously reported about mice receiving transplants enabling some light perception.

It’s unclear how many blind mice had vision restored but reports suggest somewher between 2 and 4.

Sorry…

 


Related Posts

Cameron Optometry shortlisted for Independent Practice of the Year Award

20th February 2017

We are delighted to announce that we have been shortlisted for UK Independent Practice of the Year at the Optician Awards 2017. The judges have debated, scrutinised and voted on every entry and we ...

Read more

Scientists develop new way to diagnose cataracts

24th January 2017

There is really encouraging news coming out of Edinburgh’s very own Heriot Watt University today. Scientists there have developed a new way to diagnose cataracts, which on the face of it may not see...

Read more

Why Michael McIntyre has got it all wrong about eye examinations!

16th January 2017

It’s officially ‘Blue Monday’, so for all our blog followers we thought a little humour was required. I recently watched this sketch from Michael McIntyre about visiting the optician. If you nee...

Read more

Let your eyewear give you a new look in 2017

10th January 2017

Have you started the year desperately seeking a new look? We may well have the answer. In the last few months we have welcomed some stylish, independent eyewear brands to the practice. So if you want ...

Read more