Makeup tips for glasses wearers – make the most of your frames

There was a time when some said makeup and glasses didn’t work. How wrong they were. Glasses draw attention to your face making it even more important to get your makeup just right. Makeup brands are now recognising this, providing tips specifically for glasses wearers including the likes of Bobbi Brown and Loreal.


Here are some pointers:
1. Lighten up. Make sure any dark areas under the eyes are concealed. Glasses will create a shadow so any dark areas will appear even darker, so go all out on an under eye concealer and a dab of highlighter.
2. Complement your glasses. If you’ve gone for a bright frame like these shocking pink ones from William Morris, then consider a more subtle eye shadow. Don’t make your frames compete with your eye shadow. Save any colour for your lips, not your eyes and always remember that any colour should work with your frames.
3. Frame your frames. Define the area around your glasses, paying particular attention to your eyebrows. Ensure your brows are in good shape. Tweeze, comb and define.
4. Highlight your cheekbones with a spot of rouge as people will be drawn to the area around your frames.
5. It’s all about the curl. Your lashes are on show so make them look their best. Curling will also stop long lashes touching your glasses, avoiding any unsightly mascara smudges on your lenses.
And for those days when you want to go all out on the eye shadow, give occasional wear contact lenses a try!

Protect your eyesight

“Prevention is better than cure.” “You only get one set of eyes, look after them.” Just a couple phrases that any optical professional will say on a daily basis. So with that in mind, please take some time to read this article from the RNIB. Advice that we just can’t say enough.

NHS_for eye problems

If you can’t follow all of our tips, make sure you do the most important thing: visit your optician and have an eye exam!

1. Wear sunglasses: Ultraviolet light from the sun can cause damage to your eyes. To reduce risks, when outside in the sun always wear sunglasses that have a UV factor rating and carry the CE mark.
2. Take regular screen breaks: If you use a computer, take frequent breaks from your screen – at least one an hour. Resting your eyes can avoid headaches, eyestrain, soreness and double vision.
3. Eat the right food: Foods containing either lutein or zeaxanthin can help prevent eye conditions like cataracts and age-related macular degeneration. They are found in many fruit and vegetables including: mango, squash, broccoli, green beans, and spinach.
4. Know your family eye history: Glaucoma is a condition which if detected early can be treated and controlled. It can be hereditary, so if family members have the condition you need to get your eyes tested more regularly.
5. Clean your contact lenses: Only use commercially prepared solutions for contact lens care. Never use tap or distilled water, or saliva. If you don’t stick to a strict cleansing routine your eyes can become infected and you risk corneal disease, or even the loss of an eye. You should never sleep in your contacts unless advised you can by the optometrist.
6. Wear safety glasses: Cleaning, DIY or gardening can be hazardous to your eyes as chemicals, garden debris, or nails and splinters can all cause injury. Consider wearing safety goggles.
7. Diabetics: Although the majority of people with diabetes don’t experience any eye problems, people who have diabetes are at risk of losing vision through a condition called diabetic retinopathy. If you have diabetes you should have an eye exam at least once a year.

Visit your optician: More than half of all sight loss is avoidable if the cause is caught early. A regular eye exam can identify any early indications of diseases such as cataracts, glaucoma and age related macular degeneration. It can also identify other problems such as diabetes and high blood pressure for which the optometrist can refer you back to a GP. It is recommended that people have an eye test every two years but research shows that one in four of us fail to do this.

Advice from

Blindness feared more than Alzheimer’s

Research out from the RNIB has found that adults in the UK are more afraid of losing their sight than any other age-related health condition. The survey of over 2000 people found nearly half (44%) feared blindness more than Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s or heart disease. I have many patients who have said they feel the same.

Old age eye
Not all sight loss is preventable, but throughout your life there are steps that you can take to reduce your chances of losing your sight in later years.
• Starting from childhood,parents can ensure their children’s eyes are protected from the sun by wearing sunglasses and hats. Instilling these lessons in children early on will hopefully benefit them throughout their adult lives.
Diet is also something we have covered many times before and is an essential part of maintaining a healthy lifestyle and will benefit your eyes.
• Studies have also identified that smokershave an increased risk of age-related macular degeneration.
• The importance of having regular eye tests is one that we tirelessly preach to anyone who will listen! With detailed eye examinations using the most advanced technology, we can pick up early signs of eye conditions that can then be treated or at least managed. We also take a full family history to identify where someone might have a higher risk of developing conditions such as glaucoma and manage their care accordingly.
Some degree of sight loss is usually an inevitable part of ageing, however following the above advice could make the difference between needing reading glasses and serious vision loss.

Corrective tablet screens good news for some

Another BBC article that caught my attention this week, this time about a VDU that can correct vision problems to negate the need for glasses or contact lenses. In short, because it is very technical, the technology is powered by software and algorithms that change the light that a screen emits to distort the image a user sees to their prescription.

When the article talks about one in three people suffering from some form of myopia (short-sightedness), the fact is the vast majority of these people need corrective lenses or glasses for more than just using a tablet. For these people this piece of technology is unlikely to be of any use.

However, there is a very small group who could find this technology hugely beneficial. Even with the most sophisticated contact lenses or glasses, some people with conditions such as keratoconus still see halos and ghosting when looking at VDUs. My hope is that it is that this group that may benefit from this specialist technology. Keratoconus can affect people from a relatively young age, people for whom computers an integral part of their lives both in the work place and at home, so hopefully for this group, this technology could make a real difference.

London’s first eye show – showcasing industry innovation

This month I attended 100% Optical, the UK’s inaugural eye show at London’s ExCeL. Thousands of eye enthusiasts congregated for three days of displays, conferences, fashion events and workshops. Coinciding with London Fashion Week, the event showcased some of the most stylish eye wear brands. In addition, suppliers were proudly displaying their new products and innovations.

I was fortunate to be one of the speakers, taking the stage to discuss communication and contact lenses; both passions of mine. People can feel that they have been overloaded with information after visiting their optometrist. With numerous tests and options available, it is vital that communication is at the forefront of patient care. Good communication skills, in particular, having a caring and listening nature, don’t always come naturally but these are qualities I feel are essential to ensure a productive patient/optometrist relationship.

After my seminar in the ‘Lens Hub’ I was able to enjoy all the show had to offer. As many of you know I love embracing new technology and am proud that Cameron Optometry has some of the most advanced technology available to the industry. So, I particularly enjoyed exploring the 3D Frame Factory to see how the 3D printers work and how frames are then produced. The process first involves taking a 3D scan of your head. I, of course, was happy to volunteer to be a guinea pig! I was then able to see the frames being produced first hand, as well as trying out a few of those that had been ‘made earlier’. They don’t look anything special at first, with clunky bits of plastic, but the finished products are quite impressive. European designers such as Patrick Hoet and Monoqool are winning numerous awards for their cutting edge frames. I will watch with great interest to see if this trend takes off in the UK.

Scanned head

3D printer

One designer who has definitely taken off and is now one of the leading names in stylish eyewear, is Robert William Morris. It was a great honour to meet the man behind the global brand William Morris London. He established the brand some 15 years ago and now it is seen as one of the most stylish choices in eyewear, which we can testify to as it is one of the most popular brands that we stock.


It was a hugely successful event and has certainly left me feeling inspired with so many fantastic products and suppliers demonstrating the cutting edge nature of the industry.

Eye Pavilion needs more patients on 10th June

The Eye Pavilion in Edinburgh has asked us to try to provide some patients to sit for the ophthalmology exams run by the Royal College of Surgeons.

Trainee eye doctors must pass a series of exams including one on ‘refraction’ – the art and science of testing someone for glasses.

CamOpt happen to be experts in this of course, so they are asking for our help. You need to have fairly straightforward prescription (nothing too high or weird, they’re only trainees) and be available on Monday 10th June morning and/or afternoon. They will pay your expenses and £30 and you basically sit and have your eyes tested all day – easy money!

If you are available and interested to help, please contact us at the practice and we’ll get things arranged 0131 225 2235

What goes around comes around

Spot the difference – one of these frames is from 1969 and the other 2013, can you tell which is which?

b- spotthediff


OK, it’s not that hard, the top one is a 1969 frame that we finally got to replacing for one of our loyal contact lens wearers. However, it goes to show that if you keep anything long enough, it comes back into style.

Who would have though heavy plastic frames with upswept sides would be all the rage in 2013!? I could have taken any one of about 20 frames from our range that match this antique beauty except that is was 40 years ahead of its time in 1969. In fact it’s still in quite good nick so I might pop the lenses out, stick it on display and see if anyone will buy it…

Totally distortion free lens created

It’s actually even better than the title suggests as boffins at Harvard have created a ultrathin lens that focusses light without creating any image distortion of any kind at all.

Without going into too much of the detail, lenses focus light but altering the direction and speed of light rays passing through the material. The amount of material a light ray passes through and the curvature of the 2 surfaces of the lens affect the direction light. Varying the thickness and curvature of lenses in different parts of the lens bend rays differently, focussing them or spreading them out as required.

Sort of.

All this bending of light rays causes lots of aberrations which are the names of unwanted optical distortions. Some of these you will have heard of eg defocus (such as in long and short sight) and astigmatism; but there are lots of others you probably won’t have eg coma, Petzval field curvature and so on. All these aberrations degrade the quality of the final image. We design your glasses lenses with special combinations of thickness and curvature to minimise these aberrations but you can eliminate them entirely.

If you are wearing glasses, look out through the edge rather than the centre of your lens at something white like your ceiling. You might see some coloured fringes, look through the other edge and you might see the fringes are now a different colour. This is a type of aberration called ‘chromatic aberration’.

If you’re quaffing a glass of vino, hold up the empty glass to something square behind it like a picture frame. The frame is all distorted and mishapen, this is an aberration called ‘distortion’.

This new Harvard lens has only one surface and is effectively 2 dimensional (60 nanometres thick) and not very like a lens as you would think of it. It uses tiny little V shaped ‘antennas’ made of a layer of gold on a silicone wafer. The little Vs  alter the speed of light waves instantly and they don’t require passage through a material to change direction. Altering the size and position of these ‘V’s across the surface alters the lens properties.

It’s quite obvious how a such a thin lens would be helpful in any optical system (including glasses) from a physical point of view, but the lack of aberrations is also very exciting. Super vision lenses are within our grasp!

Approved specs for the orthodox

It’s not easy for me to verify this story but more reputable sources than this blog have picked it up: street vendors are selling stick on glasses patches to blur the vision of jews concerned about their wandering eyes.

The patches apparently blur things beyond a few metres but leave close vision unaffected.  Optically, I’m not exactly sure how they can achieve this, reading glasses would achive this but you can’t stick them on on top of your regular prescription.

If you’re visiting Israel on holiday I’d be interested to see these things so see if you can pick up a set. They seem to be selling for about £5 but if you’re from Scotland you’ll know that’s only the price to start haggling from.

Sony demo new anti-glare coating

Sony have shown off a new type of coating which virtually eliminates glare from touchscreens.

Now I don’t want to be a pedant about things but it’s not strictly speaking ‘glare’ and also there is no such thing as ‘anti-glare’ coatings. I can bore you with the details if you like but they are better described as ‘anti-reflection’.

Commonly used in glasses lenses these coatings minimise the unsightly reflections people see when you’re wearing your glasses letting them actually see your eyes. They really look much much better and at CamOpt we always recommend these coatings.

They are also used in touchscreen devices to help the screen be more visible in bright light or sunshine (not often an issue in Edinburgh…). Traditional coatings use microscopic layers of a material that cause the reflections to cancel each other as they pass through the layers meaning almost nothing is reflected from the lens.

Sony’s new approach uses lots of tiny ‘lenslets’ (they say like a moth’s eye) which take the oncoming light and scatter it in all directions. Reflections require smooth surfaces so this microscopically rough surface doesn’t reflect but scatters light. Their demo is quite impressive and hopefully it can come to optics one day as long as the optical qualities of the surfaces are maintained.

Contact Us

What's on your mind?


Please enter the characters below

5 St. Vincent Street, Edinburgh EH3 6SW
0131 225 2235