Blog

New glasses help you lose weight!

Joking aside, researchers lead by Professor Michitaka Hirose at Tokyo University have been designed a special optical system that helps you lose weight.

The system uses a camera and viewing system built into a pair of glasses. As you bring your hand towards your mouth, the camera captures an image and after processing it on an attached computer, plays the image back through the glasses. Your hand is kept at its normal size but the computer is able to alter the size of the forkful you are about to eat tricking you brain into thinking your eating more than you are.

Researchers found calorie intake was reduced significantly using the system.

On the same topic there once was a lower tech version where a pair of glasses was designed with a rather ugly blue tint. The aim was to help you eat less by making food an unappetising blue hue!

Before you ask, neither is available at Cameron Optometry…yet.

Related Posts

2_lindberg
Makeup tips for glasses wearers – make the most of your frames
There was a time when some said makeup and glasses didn’t work. How wrong they were. Glasses draw attention to your face making it even more important to get your makeup just right. Makeup brands are now recognising this, provid...
3_Conditions
Protect your eyesight
“Prevention is better than cure.” “You only get one set of eyes, look after them.” Just a couple phrases that any optical professional will say on a daily basis. So with that in mind, please take some time to read this art...
cameron_Gallery_images_aw13
Blindness feared more than Alzheimer’s
Research out from the RNIB has found that adults in the UK are more afraid of losing their sight than any other age-related health condition. The survey of over 2000 people found nearly half (44%) feared blindness more than Alzhei...
Corrective tablet screens good news for some
Another BBC article that caught my attention this week, this time about a VDU that can correct vision problems to negate the need for glasses or contact lenses. In short, because it is very technical, the technology is powered by ...
London’s first eye show – showcasing industry innovation
This month I attended 100% Optical, the UK's inaugural eye show at London's ExCeL. Thousands of eye enthusiasts congregated for three days of displays, conferences, fashion events and workshops. Coinciding with London Fashion Week...
Eye Pavilion needs more patients on 10th June
The Eye Pavilion in Edinburgh has asked us to try to provide some patients to sit for the ophthalmology exams run by the Royal College of Surgeons. Trainee eye doctors must pass a series of exams including one on 'refraction' - th...
What goes around comes around
Spot the difference - one of these frames is from 1969 and the other 2013, can you tell which is which?   OK, it's not that hard, the top one is a 1969 frame that we finally got to replacing for one of our loyal contact le...
Totally distortion free lens created
It's actually even better than the title suggests as boffins at Harvard have created a ultrathin lens that focusses light without creating any image distortion of any kind at all. Without going into too much of the detail, lenses ...
Approved specs for the orthodox
It's not easy for me to verify this story but more reputable sources than this blog have picked it up: street vendors are selling stick on glasses patches to blur the vision of jews concerned about their wandering eyes. The patche...
Sony demo new anti-glare coating
Sony have shown off a new type of coating which virtually eliminates glare from touchscreens. Now I don't want to be a pedant about things but it's not strictly speaking 'glare' and also there is no such thing as 'anti-glare' coat...
Another frame we’ll never stock
Hot on the heels of the bizarre looking A-Frame comes the Ron Arad 'Corbs'. Apparently taking inspiration from a vertebrates spine, the sunglasses are designed without hinges to give a snugger fit that should never come loose. ...
Shorter female arms mean reading glasses sooner!
Some brave souls in America have suggested that the reason women need reading glasses before men is due to the their smaller stature and therefore shorter arms. Many studies have demonstrated women require reading glasses sooner ...
Glasses to fit any face
These frankly quite awful looking glasses are actually quite innovative and may be coming to a shelf near you. Ron Arad's A-frame series are so adjustable they can fit almost any face. The nose piece hides a clever hinge which yo...
Online specs ‘dangerous’
Surprise surprise, online spectacles are pretty rubbish. So rubbish that  much of the time they don't even meet the basic British Standards and are potentially dangerous for your eyes says consumer watchdog Which. 36 pairs of gla...
New Styles – Bevel
Timeless design,
 Innovative use of colour and quality of materials. It was these features that initially enticed us towards Bevel, but It wasn’t until we had them in our hands in Milan, or in fact, until Heather had them on ...
Bionic eyes cometh in 2013
Australian scientists hope to have a prototype bionic eye built and ready to test on humans within the next year. The bionic eye which we've highlighted before gives hope to people suffering from various types of retinal degenerat...
MIT produces self cleaning glass
Boffins at MIT have come up with a new type of glass that resists fogging, eliminates reflections and is 'self cleaning'. The surface of the glass is covered with tiny nanocones (1000 times thinner than human hair) which break ...
Self healing film repairs scratches
A Japanese company has developed a special film they say self-repairs minor scratches. Currently being trialed on computer screens, a whole host of applications are possible including smartphone screens and most exctigin to us, gl...
Project Glass – Already here!
So I was wrong. Why wait for Google to faff around taking ages to make their Project Glass specs we highlighted a couple of days ago? Just go ahead and make your own like this chap with too much time on his hands: ...
Project Glass – still a long way off
You'll probably have seen this It's a pretty cool idea already available in limited form by phone manufacturers. What's got the internet crackling is that Google is throwing its weight behind the idea of augmented reality which...
Eye examinations can uncover signs of brain tumours in children
Each week around 10 children are diagnosed with brain tumours in the UK. There are many symptoms that could indicate a brain tumour such as headaches, vomiting and difficulty with balance. There are also signs that can be picked u...
cameron_Gallery_images_aw18
Signs of cataracts appearing earlier
There was a worrying article in this week’s Optician Magazine summarising research that has found that patients are developing cataracts at an earlier age. A third of British adults knew someone who had been diagnosed with catar...
3_Glasses
Short-sightedness in children must be managed
A study out this week has found that yet again the rate of myopia (short-sightedness) in young people is on the rise. Now more common between aged 25 and 29 than those aged 55 to 59, with as many as half of this age group sufferin...
cameron_Gallery_images_aw13
Blindness feared more than Alzheimer’s
Research out from the RNIB has found that adults in the UK are more afraid of losing their sight than any other age-related health condition. The survey of over 2000 people found nearly half (44%) feared blindness more than Alzhei...
Could watching TV provide an accurate glaucoma diagnosis?
Sounds fanciful but recent research has found that watching how the eyes move when someone is watching TV could give an accurate indication of glaucoma and other neurodegenerative conditions. An article published earlier this mont...
How ageing affects the relationship between the eyes and the brain
A study in the journal Current Biology goes some way to explain why thinking ability in some people decreases as they get older and the key factor was the loss of ability to process visual information quickly or ‘at a glance’....
London Eye Pavillion utilising NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope to benefit AMD sufferers
The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was launched into orbit in 1990. It was initially flawed as images came back fuzzy however utilising some extraordinarily complex optical calculations, mirrors were used to correct the flaws and pr...
Gene therapy breakthrough could improve sight
After years of exploration, I was delighted to read that scientists at Oxford Uni have succeeded in restoring the sight in people with a form of degenerative eye disease. Choroideremia affects about 1 in 50,000 people who see t...
Contact lens specialist symposium 2013
Cameron Optometry were invited to attend the first CLSS specialist contact lens symposium in London last weekend. World leading experts , and great speakers such as Pat Caroline, Randy Kojima, and Eef van der Worp presented some ...
The cornea…but not as we knew it
Patients often tell us that at each visit we unveil some new exciting gadget or piece of technology for investigating the health of their eyes. It seems like that to us too! In this ever changing tecnhological world though, where ...
Computer games could be good for your eyes
It’s not the sort of advice you might expect from your optometrist but current research from  McGill University in Canada suggests that playing the video game Tetris may be an effective way of improving a lazy (amblyopic) eye. ...
Eye scan can monitor the extent of MS
As you may have noticed at your eye appointments over the last couple of years, in addition to taking a retinal photograph of your eyes we offer a scan of the deeper retinal layers, using our Optical Coherence Tomographer (OCT) sc...
AAO 2012 Phoenix – Day 1: A nerd’s paradise
If you love eyes, AAO is like Nirvana. Is your chance to be as nerdy as you like about eyes and no one thinks you're weird or boring! I only made it to 4am before I was wide awake but fortunately had a 7.15am start with a breakfas...
AAO 2012 Phoenix – Day 2: A view into the future
Well day 2 has been even better than day 1 although it was another 4am start. I'm like a kid in a sweet shop, there are so many interesting lectures I'm having a hard time choosing. I opted for "What's new in retina" which was a g...
Long eyes less likely to have diabetic retinopathy
Finally some good news for the short sighted as people with long axial lengths (that is the length of the eyeball, front to back) are less likely to suffer from diabetic eye disease. Myopia or shortsightedness is where rays of lig...
Glaucoma plugs could stop the need for drops
A trial of a new method of delivering glaucoma medication by using a slow release punctum plug has started. Glaucoma usually requires patients to permanently take drops once or twice a day to reduce pressure inside the eye. Patien...
Bionic eyes shows continued success
An Australian group have restored some minimal sight to a patient through an implanted bionic eye. The implant is connected to an external head mounted camera which sends impulses to electrodes planted underneath the retina. The p...
Totally distortion free lens created
It's actually even better than the title suggests as boffins at Harvard have created a ultrathin lens that focusses light without creating any image distortion of any kind at all. Without going into too much of the detail, lenses ...
Potential cure for Dry AMD
There has been a breakthrough in the treatment of the previously untreatable form of macular degeneration ('dry AMD'). Kentucky vision Scientists have discovered the complex chain reaction of proteins and enzymes that happens in t...
Caffeine raises eye pressure
A big and seemingly well designed study has shown the effect of caffiene on intraocular pressure (IOP). 106 patients split into 4 groups (3 types of glaucoma, 1 no glaucoma) and were seen twice. Before 1 visit they were given caf...