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Shorter female arms mean reading glasses sooner!

Some brave souls in America have suggested that the reason women need reading glasses before men is due to the their smaller stature and therefore shorter arms.

Many studies have demonstrated women require reading glasses sooner than men even though they have the same focussing ability (or lack of) – a condition that comes to us all called presbyopia. The researchers suggested that this is because women tend to hold things closer than men and went on to pin the blame shorter female arms.

It’s one of those rare occasions where common sense and science actually meet but I’m not really sure this research really tells us anything useful. However the lead scientist sought to ramp up the importance by saying “These findings could impact global vision care in multiple ways”.

Err, steady on.

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