Controlling short-sightedness in children - Cameron Optometry | Cameron Optometry
Controlling short-sightedness in children

Controlling short-sightedness in children

Posted on 17th July 2015

myopia

Myopia Control programme launches in a bid to slow the progression of short-sightedness in children.

We are delighted to be able to announce the launch of our Myopia Control service at Cameron Optometry using our expertise in contact lenses, to significantly reduce the progression of short-sightedness in children. The aim is to ensure by the time they reach adulthood their vision is substantially better than it would be if left untreated and also reducing the chance of a child developing serious eye conditions in later life.

What is myopia?

Myopia is the medical term for short-sightedness, when the eyeball is too long or too powerful, causing objects in the distance to look blurred.

Generally once you have myopia your prescription declines over time, in particular during childhood as the eye develops. If a child is myopic, they are at risk of their vision deteriorating quickly. Not only does this mean reliance on strong glasses, higher levels of myopia are also linked to an increased risk of developing eye diseases such as glaucoma, retinal detachment, macular degeneration and cataract in later life.

What is Myopia Control?

Myopia Control aims to slow the progression of myopia in children through the use of specialised contact lenses. At Cameron Optometry our expertise in contact lenses allows us to provide the most advanced options available based on up to date research, which has found Myopia Control contact lenses can slow the progression of myopia by up to 50%.

How do the contact lenses work?

Myopia Control contact lenses are designed to correct your child’s vision by slowing the process of elongation and enlargement of the eyeball. There are two types of Myopia Control lenses available currently: lenses that are worn only when asleep (orthokeratology) or lenses which are worn during waking hours (multifocals).

It cannot completely halt the progression, however the aim is that by the time your child reaches adulthood their prescription will be significantly less than it would have been if their myopia was left untreated, reducing their risk of serious eye disease in later life.

For further information please visit www.cameronoptom.com/myopia or get in touch to speak to Gillian Bruce, our specialist in Myopia Control.


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