Ian’s photo shortlisted for award

Ian’s photo shortlisted for award

Posted on 09th June 2013

A photo by Ian of a CamOpt patient’s eye has been shortlisted for the BCLA’s photographic competition 2013.

b- lens prolapse

This picture shows the natural lens of the eye (the crystalline lens which gets cataract as you get older) has fallen forward into the front chamber of the eye. It’s a wee bit hard to tell what’s going on unless you revise your eye anatomy, so here goes:

b- anatomy

The lens sits behind the iris, the coloured part of the eye and is attached firmly. In some conditions the attachments weaken. In 99.9% of cases the lens falls backward into the back chamber of the eye and you can’t see it, but in this case, it came forward, through the pupil and is quite visible. It’s amazing to see how sharp and neat a structure it is – it looks a like a man made contact lens.

Ian faces stiff competition from researchers and professional medical photographers, so we shall see. You can view the other entries here


Related Posts

Multifocal contact lenses for ageing eyes

25th September 2017

Our eyes stiffen gradually throughout our adult lives. Generally, it isn’t until people reach their forties or older, that they start to notice the effects of this. The stiffening of the lens in the...

Read more

National Eye Health Week: Sight after sixty

22nd September 2017

As part of National Eye Health Week, we are highlighting key eye care advice for various groups. Today we're sharing Vision Matters' advice on the ageing eye, sight after sixty. Our visual ...

Read more

National Eye Health Week: Children’s eye sight

19th September 2017

As part of National Eye Health Week we are encouraging people to ensure they're giving their eyes the best possible care. Today we're looking at children's vision. Your child’s sight is precious....

Read more

Gillian Bruce top performing masters student

05th September 2017

It goes without saying that we’re incredibly passionate about eyes at Cameron Optometry. At least one of our team is always in the midsts of some form of eye-related studies, looking for ways to gai...

Read more